the monday inspiration.

I love a game of Would You Rather. If you had to choose, would you pick smelling terrible for the rest of your life or having both your legs amputated? Would you rather have the main character in every movie replaced by Nicholas Cage or every song sung by Nickelback? Would you rather have 12 kids or zero? Would you rather have the ugliest house in a fancy neighborhood or the most beautiful one in an average one? Would you rather a year of travel or a $100,000 check?

One of the fallback prompts that I’ve found to be a telling insight into a person is the following: Would you rather live an average life, die, and be largely forgotten, or would you rather be Van Gogh’d– ridiculed and impoverished during your earthly days and then remembered as a genius forever forward? I think I’d go with the tame and average life (and look at how dutifully I’m walking that talk, ha), but the idea of having people refer to others who have been influenced by HRCK the Herald and its lasting legacy is pretty tempting.

I was reminded of that would you rather when I came across this post– 11 Early Scathing Reviews of Works Now Considered Masterpieces. Here are a few from the list:

Pride and Prejudice, by Jane Austen (1813)

Early Reaction: …Charlotte Brontë (of Jane Eyre fame) wasn’t buying the hype: “Anything like warmth or enthusiasm, anything energetic, poignant, heartfelt, is utterly out of place in commending these works: all such demonstrations the authoress would have met with a well-bred sneer, would have calmly scorned as outré or extravagant…”

Fred Astaire (1899 – 1987)

Early Reaction: “Can’t act. Can’t sing. Slightly bald. Can dance a little.” –MGM Testing Director’s response to Astaire’s first screen test

Ulysses, by James Joyce (1918)

Early Reaction: “In Ireland they try to make a cat clean by rubbing its nose in its own filth. Mr. Joyce has tried the same treatment on the human subject” –George Bernard Shaw

Leaves of Grass, by Walt Whitman (first pub. 1855)

Early Reaction: Upon reading the newly published Leaves, Whitman’s boss at the Department of the Interior took offense—and gave his underling the axe.

*Fellow poet John Greenleaf Whittier supposedly hurled his 1855 edition into the fire.
*“A mass of stupid filth” -Rufus Wilmot Griswold, The Criterion, November 10, 1855
*“It is no discredit to Walt Whitman that he wrote Leaves of Grass, only that he did not burn it afterwards.” –Thomas Wentworth Higginson, The Atlantic, “Literature as an Art,” 1867
*“… the book cannot attain to any very wide influence.” –The Atlantic, January 1882

So, to reduce all this to a nice little message,

Go do your thang.

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happy weekend!

Friday again! Lots of very fun things happening this weekend, but the most exciting by FAR is that my sister is having twin girls! She and her husband have kept the names secret, and I can’t wait to hear what the little chickadees will be called (though I’m pretty darn confident about my guesses…).

So looking forward to meeting the little ladies and so happy to have two new members in the family!

the pop’s pictures.

These are adorable. Wedding photographer Jason Lee decided to turn the camera from the brides and grooms to his two daughters, and apparently the girls aren’t quite old enough yet to refuse all parental requests.  The photos are creative, the girls are so cute (and compliant!), and I’m a sucker for sweet Dad/Daughter stuff.

Hope the girls are getting a few extra bucks in their weekly allowance for being such ready models.

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the paintings in your closet.

Every morning in high school, after dragging myself out of bed at 6:20, I would slowly trudge to my dressing room and promptly collapse down on the carpet to stare blearily at my clothes, hoping some creative outfit inspiration would strike. These days, 6:20 counts as sleeping in, and I don’t put as much thought into my clothes as I probably should. Both then and now, I could probably get a bit of inspiration from Thread and Canvas.  The site takes famous paintings and comes up with sartorial getups that echo the aesthetic. Here are a couple of my favorite paintings in clothes form. 

The blogger also puts from where each piece of clothing comes, so if you’ve just got to have that Degas skirt, she can hook ya up.

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the redemption.

I haven’t been posting much because I haven’t been that in love with anything I’ve come across on the internet recently. That changed about two minutes ago.

I have become more sentimental over the past few years, but I like to think the fact that I didn’t cry over a movie or book or song or poem or whatever until I was in college means I have some sort of emotional bar. Right now, however, I’m struggling to keep from crying happy tears. If you haven’t seen this yet, PLEASE go watch Caine’s Arcade. I rarely watch/suggest online videos because I find them very tedious to sit through, but this one is worth it. Your heart will swell.

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happy weekend!

I have been looking forward to this weekend for WEEKS. I am so excited to go home tonight for Easter.

Things that I will NOT be doing to celebrate include making many of the weird Easter creations I’ve seen on Pinterest.

Who wants to hack off a chunk of a bunny’s backside for dessert? I guess it’s a cute pudgy little image, but I don’t want to eat that.

Similarly, I don’t want to be forced to make a comparison between some creamy dip and the stomach contents of an animal like this: And this yolky cupcake-stuffed-into-eggshell isn’t in any way appealing at all.

I’ll be sticking to the classics this year

Happy Easter, and happy weekend!

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